Attackers Pounce on Zero-Day Java Exploit – Krebs on Security

Attackers have seized upon a previously unknown security hole in Oracle’s ubiquitous Java software to break into vulnerable systems. So far, the attacks exploiting this weakness have been targeted and not widespread, but it appears that the exploit code is now public and is being folded into more widely-available attack tools such as Metasploit and exploit kits like BlackHole.

Attackers Pounce on Zero Day Java Exploit – Krebs on Security

A Metasploit module developed to target this Java 0-day.

News of the vulnerability (CVE-2012-4681) surfaced late last week in a somewhat sparse blog post by FireEye, which said the exploit seemed to work against the latest version of Java 7, which is version 1.7, Update 6. This morning, researchers Andre’ M. DiMino & Mila Parkour published additional details on the targeted attacks seen so far, confirming that the zero-day affects Java 7 Update 0 through 6, but does not appear to impact Java 6 and below.

Initial reports indicated that the exploit code worked against all versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Opera, but did not work against Google Chrome. But according to Rapid 7, there is a Metasploit module in development that successfully deploys this exploit against Chrome (on at least Windows XP).

Also, there are indications that this exploit will soon be rolled into the BlackHole exploit kit. Contacted via instant message, the curator of the widely-used commercial attack tool confirmed that the now-public exploit code worked nicely, and said he planned to incorporate it into BlackHole as early as today. “The price of such an exploit if it were sold privately would be about $100,000,” wrote Paunch, the nickname used by the BlackHole author.

Oracle is not scheduled to release another security update for Java until October. In the meantime, it’s a good idea to either unplug Java from your browser or uninstall it from your computer completely.

Windows users can find out if they have Java installed and which version by visiting java.com and clicking the “Do I have Java? link. Mac users can use the Software Update feature to check for any available Java updates.

If you primarily use Java because some Web site, or program you have on your system — such as OpenOffice or Freemind — requires it, you can still dramatically reduce the risk from Java attacks just by disabling the plugin in your Web browser. In this case, I  would suggest a two-browser approach. If you normally browse the Web with Firefox, for example, consider disabling the Java plugin in Firefox, and then using an alternative browser (ChromeIE9Safari, etc.) with Java enabled to browse only the site that requires it.

For browser-specific instructions on disabling Java, click here.

If you must use Java, security experts are prepping an unofficial patch for the program that should blunt this vulnerability, but it is being offered on a per-request basis at this point. A number of experts I know and respect have vouched for the integrity of this patch, but installing third-party patches should not be done lightly. Note that regressing to the latest version of Java 6 (Java/JRE 6 Update 34) is certainly an option, but not a very good one either. If you do not need Java, get rid of it, and if you do need it for specific applications or sites, limit your use of Java to those sites and applications, using a secondary browser for that purpose.

If you liked this post, check out my follow-up story, Researchers: Java Zero-Day Leveraged Two Flaws.

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